The Strange Case Of Dr Jekyll And Mr Hyde Essay

The Strange Case Of Dr Jekyll And Mr Hyde Essay-50

THE ESSAYIn “ The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde,” Robert Stevenson explores the nature of evil through his main character Mr Hyde.


THE ESSAYIn “ The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde,” Robert Stevenson explores the nature of evil through his main character Mr Hyde.

Mr Hyde was pale and dwarfish he gave an impression of deformity without any nameable malformation, he had a displeasing smile, he had borne himself to the lawyer with a sort of murderous mixture of timidity and boldness, and he spoke with a husky whispering and somewhat broken voice, – all these were points against him but not all of these together could explain the hitherto unknown disgust, loathing and fear with which Mr Utterson regarded him. Or is it the mere radiance of a foul soul that thus transpires through, and transfigures, its clay continent?

‘ There must be something else,’ said the perplexed gentleman. The last, I think for, O my poor old Harry Jekyll, if ever I read Satan’s signature upon a face, it is on that of your new friend!

People with such deformities, such as the elephant man, would be seen in shows for entertainment and shock value.

In other parts of the novel, Stevenson describes Mr Hyde by saying that there is something `wrong with his appearance,` which is ‘displeasing’ and `downright detestable.` This use of alliteration in `downright detestable` not only brings emphasis to Hyde’s appearance, but it also vividly highlights Hyde’s evil and fear-inducing characteristics.

Since no physical deformity is ever named, one could suggest that it is Hyde’s soul that is deformed.  Furthermore, Mr Hyde is also described as being `troglodytic` or primitive, thus relating Mr Hyde to savage cavemen.

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Only a few decades before Stevenson’s book, Darwin produced his theory of evolution.

This theory states that we all evolved from one common ancestor: the primitive animal.

Victorian society, at the time, was religious and too traditional to hear Darwin’s radical theory.

That is why Mr Hyde’s appearance is so shocking and frightening, because he embodies primitivism.

In a sense, Mr Hyde’s behaviour and appearance could be considered an extended metaphor of the novel that evil and savagery lies within all of us, as it does with Dr Jekyll in the form of Mr Hyde.

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